Souths Logan Magpies trio Jack Joass, Leon Panapa and Dan Tamou in the 'Turn to Me' gear.

With a breakthrough semi-final berth on the line, this weekend’s Round 25 match looms as the biggest match in Josh Hannay’s three-year tenure with Souths Logan.

But while the Magpies coach is desperate for his team to seal a finals berth, the former Cowboy hasn’t lost sight of the bigger picture heading into their crucial match against the Burleigh Bears.

Hannay is leading the call for all Intrust Super Cup clubs to embrace the QRL’s ‘Turn to Me’ Round this weekend.

Initiated in 2013 by Petero Civoniceva, Isaak Ah Mau and Steven Johnson with the backing of the QRL, the now annual campaign encourages the game’s participants to reach out to a coach, player or mate.

The initiative will this year align itself with the NRL’s mental health and wellbeing partners – Lifeline, the Black Dog Institute, Kids Helpline and headspace – (see further information below).

“The ‘Turn to Me’ initiative and the message that it puts out there is a great one … just to let players know to ask for help, (and) seek help if you’re not in the best mental shape,” Hannay said.

“One of the great things about the rugby league community is we’re a tight-knit community.

“It’s a really important message to let players know, and not only players but officials and anyone involved the game, that there’s always someone beside you or someone there that’s prepared to listen so speak up.”

As part of the game’s commitment to this area, each Intrust Super Cup club has had a member of their organisation trained in mental health first aid.

Throughout the course of this weekend’s ‘Turn to Me’ round, the following game day activities will take place at seven venues:

-          ‘Turn to Me t-shirts will be worn over players’ jerseys.

-          Pete Murray’s Better Days song will play over the PA as players take the field.

-          Teams will line up on the half-way line and face the grandstand.

-          ‘Turn to Me’ message will be read out after the song.

-          T-shirts will be given to crowd members before kick off. 

The campaign will be rolled out with the backing of Swich On, an Ipswich-based organisation which has contributed substantial funding to the program this year following a successful luncheon in July.

NRL mental health and wellbeing partners:

Lifeline:

Lifeline is a national charity providing all Australians experiencing a personal crisis with access to 24-hour crisis support and suicide prevention services.

Black Dog Institute:

Founded in 2002, the Black Dog Institute is internationally recognised as a pioneer in the identification, prevention and treatment of mental illnesses, and the promotion of wellbeing. The Institute aims to improve the lives of people affected by mental illness through the rapid translation of high quality research into improved clinical treatments, increased accessibility to mental health services and delivery of long-term public health solutions.

Kids Helpline:

Kids Helpline is Australia’s only free, 24/7 phone and online counselling service for young people aged 5 to 25. For 25 years Australia’s kids and young people have been turning to the organisation’s professional and specialised counsellors.

Headspace:

Headspace is the National Youth Mental Health Foundation providing early intervention mental health services to 12-25 year olds, along with assistance in promoting young peoples’ wellbeing. This covers four core areas: mental health, physical health, work and study support and alcohol and other drug services.