Broncos winger Julia Robinson.

Brisbane Broncos winger Julia Robinson had not played rugby league five months ago but now she has now been described by assistant coach Michael Hancock as "something special" and one of the side’s standout performers.

The esteem that Robinson is now held in is reflective of a remarkable rise for the 20-year-old army private who has already been tagged as a representative player of the very near future.

She will line up on the left wing for the Broncos in the NRLW grand final against the Sydney Roosters at ANZ Stadium as one of the key members of the Brisbane side after scoring two tries and making three linebreaks and 19 tackle breaks in three games, while averaging 96 running metres per match.

Robinson played for the Australian Defence Force (ADF) side in June at the women's national championships where she had a stellar tournament. Queensland selectors were watching and checked with officials to make sure she was from north of the border, such was the impact Robinson made.

In the Holden Women's Premiership she has already become known for a signature play where she leaps into the air close to the try-line to hurdle defenders to score. Robinson's toughness came to the fore in the round one win over the Dragons where she clashed heads with opposition centre Jess Sergis. A giant egg appeared on Robinson's head but she bravely played on in her NRLW debut.

Broncos winger Julia Robinson.
Broncos winger Julia Robinson. ©Gregg Porteous/NRL Photos

Hancock has been blown away by Robinson's development and her verve.

"It is a fantastic story. She's in the army so has to deal with men all the time and now she gets to play with the girls," Hancock said.

"They have all got a story, not only Julia, but she stands out because she is vibrant, she puts it on the line every time she plays and she holds nothing back.

"That is why people warm to her because that is how she plays, and every time she trains she does exactly the same. She's a pocket rocket and great to have around the team. Being 20, she is something special."

Robinson's centre partner Amber Pilley already has the utmost faith in her wing partner.

 "I love having Robbo on my wing," she said.

"I know she has the speed to back me up all day and no matter what happens. I have so much trust and faith in her ability. It is ridiculous that she has only played a handful of games but you wouldn't pick it. I think she is awesome and has definitely been one of the [competition] standouts in my opinion."

Hancock, a five-time premiership winner at the Broncos, said it had been a thrill for him to work with such a caring group of girls.

"That is which makes our job really enjoyable. You can't wait to get into training," he said.

"Since I have finished playing I have had two coaching roles, and both have been with the women. I've loved every minute of it because they care and are very thankful about what you do for them.

"Their attitude has been phenomenal. The sacrifices that each and every one of the 22 have had to make to be here have been quite surreal for them with the things they have had to leave behind … families and jobs.

"It has been a remarkable journey for them and, win or lose on Sunday, it will be a memory entrenched in not only rugby league history but also their lives."