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Why would a successful businesswoman in one of the boom economic areas of Australia – Queensland's Gold Coast – want to get involved with rugby league?

Especially when previous entities like the Giants, Seagulls and Chargers had fallen flat.

It's a no-brainer if you ask the Gold Coast Titans' former chair and current co-owner Rebecca Frizelle.

"Sport is an incredibly important pillar that underpins communities across our country," Frizelle told NRL.com.

"The Gold Coast and northern NSW areas are rugby league heartland and we're committed to the continued growth of not just 'grass roots' sport for our kids, but providing a pathway through to the professional level.

"The importance of sport shouldn’t be underestimated – rugby league has the power and ability to unite entire communities," she said. 

"The Titans have been the pride of our city and we are working incredibly hard to deliver on that city pride consistently."

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Frizelle is chief operating officer for Frizelle Sunshine Automotive and the privately owned car dealership was one of the club's first sponsors, joining in 2006 ahead of the Titans' foundation season in 2007.

In the past 13 years there have been two wooden spoons and only three finals appearances.

There have been financial woes, drug cases, coaches sacked, players moved on, and reputations damaged.

But through it all Frizelle has been one of the constants. And she says the rewards aren't always measured in results – although she admits she can't wait for the Titans to be in the NRL finals again.

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"There have been many times that I gave myself a stern talking to and asked myself 'Why?'," she said.

"Absolutely, like any business that involves risk, there have been many ups and downs. For all the downsides, there are many wonderful highlights to celebrate that don’t always take place on the field.

"Our investment in junior rugby league, our support of the women’s school competition under the Karen Murphy Cup, our development of the Titans physical disability team, and our ongoing commitment to indigenous education alongside our club legend Preston Campbell with the Deadly Choices organisation, are just some of the highlights that happen off the field.

"Sorry for getting excited, but these initiatives are so rewarding!" Frizelle said.

"Rugby league, for all its trials and tribulations, is an incredible game where everyone is welcome."

Seeing first-hand how a football club and its stars can change lives is why Frizelle has no intention of letting go, and why in Harvey Norman's Women in League week she would recommend any woman get involved with the sport.

"We all have different skill sets and perspectives that can add value, irrespective of gender, age or race," she said.

"There are so many ways to become a part of rugby league but you need to work out how you want to get involved and where your ability could best be utilised.

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"Is it via professional contributions in terms of your expertise? Is it a career in professional sport? Are you looking to contribute at a grassroots level?  Or maybe you just want to get involved any way you can," Frizelle said.

"My recommendation in the first instance would be to touch base with your local rugby league club who will provide advice and point you in the right direction.

"The Titans, and more broadly the game, is full of passionate and hardworking people. The rewards and personal satisfaction are significant – you don’t have to win all the time to know that you are winning in the long run.

"It truly is not just the greatest game of all but the greatest game FOR all and the reality is, we are changing people's lives for the better every day."