Goodes voices support for Latrell's passionate anti-racism promise

Latrell Mitchell has vowed to continue "naming and shaming" discrimination, with Adam Goodes - among countless others - voicing his support for one of the biggest anti-racism stances in Australian sport since the former Sydney Swan's hellish end to his career.

Mitchell was prolific once more on Sunday as the Roosters powered to a 42-6 drubbing of the Warriors, the indigenous centre bagging 18 points in another bumper haul at the SCG.

His two-try effort came a week after calling out racial abuse on social media, prompting an NRL investigation and a wave of support from inside and outside the game.

Speaking for the first time since making national headlines and prompting overdue scrutiny around online conduct, Mitchell passionately vowed to fight discrimination in any form.

"I just want to make sure that people understand that I’m not gonna stand back and take it on the chin - I really stand up for myself and my family," Mitchell said in the SCG sheds.

"Everything that is said about Aboriginal people really affects me.

"I'll name and shame whoever does it, I don't care.

"I'm really proud about this and I want everyone in the indigenous community and the non-indigenous community to stand up and make sure we're stamping it out.

"We are what we see and if we see racism, we can't stand for that stuff. You can't live with it, I can't."

Mitchell has been overwhelmed with support from all corners, not least Goodes, who contacted Mitchell during the week having been booed into retirement after calling out racial abuse from a teenage fan in 2013.

Goodes has since said he has "fallen out of love with AFL" as a result of the ongoing saga, with the governing body offering a formal apology for mishandling the booing of the 2014 Australian of the Year.

Mitchell commended the AFL and NRL for their approach to racial issues in more recent times, revealing he had also spoken to current indigenous Swans star Buddy Franklin on the matter as well.

"Adam Goodes reached out the other day and that was awesome," Mitchell said.

"It was a big thing and I spoke to Buddy [too]. The AFL have really taken into consideration how indigenous things work around the community and what's been said and what is going and it's a credit to the AFL.

"And for [NRL CEO] Todd Greenberg to come out and applaud me for what I was doing, it's a big thing.

"[Goodes] just gave me a message and said 'I love what you’re doing' ... just the last couple of weeks for standing up for myself as well.

"He said it was pretty much similar to what he went through in his career. I take my hat off to him - getting booed every game is nothing you want to be going through as a footy player.

"It’s only a game, like I’ve said. I’m very emotional when it comes to these things because we don’t need to run out and be booed.

"We go out and do what we love to entertain people, not to be booed. I don’t get it."

Coach Trent Robinson commended Mitchell on his ability to focus on football amid all the hype and headlines, his flurry of points making for 120 scored in his last six outings at the SCG.

"That's my thing as a coach, to make sure he is not carrying the weight of the week into the game," Robinson said.

"And it's not this week and it's finished, it's his whole life.

"But his ability to clear his energy and get light again and go out and play. And he did that."